Monday, August 8, 2011

Mailbox Monday -- August 8th


The reason why I love Mondays -- Mailbox Monday hosted this month by Life in the Thumb. Below are the books I received this week:

1) Strangers at the Feast by Jennifer Vanderbes. Publisher's Summary. On Thanksgiving Day 2007, as the country teeters on the brink of a recession, three generations of the Olson family gather. Eleanor and Gavin worry about their daughter, a single academic, and her newly adopted Indian child, and about their son, who has been caught in the imploding real-estate bubble. While the Olsons navigate the tensions and secrets that mark their relationships, seventeen-year-old Kijo Jackson and his best friend Spider set out from the nearby housing projects on a mysterious job. A series of tragic events bring these two worlds ever closer, exposing the dangerously thin line between suburban privilege and urban poverty, and culminating in a crime that will change everyone's life.

In her gripping new book, Jennifer Vanderbes masterfully lays bare the fraught lives of this complex cast of characters and the lengths to which they will go to protect their families. Strangers at the Feast is at once a heartbreaking portrait of a family struggling to find happiness and an exploration of the hidden costs of the American dream.

Published to international acclaim, Jennifer Vanderbes's first book, Easter Island, was hailed as "one of those rare novels that appeals equally to heart, mind, and soul," by the San Francisco Chronicle. In her second novel, this powerful writer reaches new heights of storytelling. This page-turner wrestles with the most important issues of our time—race, class, and above all else, family. Strangers at the Feast will leave readers haunted and deeply affected.

2) The Very Thought of You by Rosie Alison. Publisher's Summary. England, 31st August 1939: The world is on the brink of war. As Hitler prepares to invade Poland, thousands of children are evacuated from London to escape the impending Blitz. Torn from her mother, eight-year-old Anna Sands is relocated with other children to a large Yorkshire estate which has been opened up to evacuees by Thomas and Elizabeth Ashton, an enigmatic, childless couple. Soon Anna gets drawn into their unraveling relationship, seeing things that are not meant for her eyes and finding herself part-witness and part-accomplice to a love affair with unforeseen consequences. A story of longing, loss, and complicated loyalties, combining a sweeping narrative with subtle psychological observation, The Very Thought of You is not just a love story but a story about love.

3) The Mistress's Revenge by Tamar Cohen. Publisher's Summary. For five years, Sally and Clive have been lost in a passionate affair. Now he has dumped her to devote himself to his wife and family, and Sally is left in freefall.

It starts with a casual stroll past his house, and popping into the brasserie where his son works. Then Sally starts following Clive's wife and daughter on Facebook. But that's alright, isn't it? These are perfectly normal things to do. Aren't they?

Not since Fatal Attraction has the fallout from an illicit affair been exposed in such a sharp, darkly funny, and disturbing way: The Mistress's Revenge is a truly exciting fiction debut. After all, who doesn't know an otherwise sane woman who has gone a little crazy when her heart was broken?

4) The Hundred-Foot Journey by Richard C. Morais. Publisher's Summary.
"That skinny Indian teenager has that mysterious something that comes along once a generation. He is one of those rare chefs who is simply born. He is an artist."

And so begins the rise of Hassan Haji, the unlikely gourmand who recounts his life's journey in Richard Morais's charming novel, The Hundred-Foot Journey. Lively and brimming with the colors, flavors, and scents of the kitchen, The Hundred-Foot Journey is a succulent treat about family, nationality, and the mysteries of good taste.

Born above his grandfather's modest restaurant in Mumbai, Hassan first experienced life through intoxicating whiffs of spicy fish curry, trips to the local markets, and gourmet outings with his mother. But when tragedy pushes the family out of India, they console themselves by eating their way around the world, eventually settling in LumiÈre, a small village in the French Alps.

The boisterous Haji family takes LumiÈre by storm. They open an inexpensive Indian restaurant opposite an esteemed French relais—that of the famous chef Madame Mallory—and infuse the sleepy town with the spices of India, transforming the lives of its eccentric villagers and infuriating their celebrated neighbor. Only after Madame Mallory wages culinary war with the immigrant family, does she finally agree to mentor young Hassan, leading him to Paris, the launch of his own restaurant, and a slew of new adventures.

The Hundred-Foot Journey is about how the hundred-foot distance between a new Indian kitchen and a traditional French one can represent the gulf between different cultures and desires. A testament to the inevitability of destiny, this is a fable for the ages—charming, endearing, and compulsively readable.

All thanks to Simon and Schuster!

15 comments:

  1. Great mailbox! I've got The Very Thought of You, too, and Strangers at the Feast sounds good! Happy reading :)

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  2. Interesting mailbox :D I hope they are good

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  3. Kim, I loved Strangers at the Feast; hope you do as well.

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  4. Thanks for visiting my blog--happy reading!

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  5. You had a great week! I read Strangers at the Feast last year and really enjoyed it.

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  6. I have The Very Thought of You, too. I'll keep an eye out for your review. Enjoy all your new books!

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  7. Great mailbox! I read The Hundred Foot Journey last summer and really enjoyed it. Enjoy your new goodies!

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  8. I've heard good things about "Strangers". Hope you enjoy all your books!

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  9. The Very Thought of You sounds very good.Hope you enjoy your books!

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  10. Strangers at the Feast is fantastic - seriously I raved about it last year and can't wait to hear your thoughts.

    Mistress Revenge sounds very Fatal Attraction like - serves the cheats a lesson for being unfaithful.

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  11. I have heard great things about Strangers at the Feast. I hope you enjoy all your new books.

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  12. Great mailbox! The Hundred Foot Journey sounds like a fantastic read. Will look for your review.

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  13. Strangers at the Feast sounds so interesting.

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  14. I have Strangers but still haven't read it!! Enjoy your great list of reads!

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